Thursday, July 13, 2017

July 2017 Plant Profile: Hydrangea integrifolia


Each month the UW Botanic Gardens' Newsletter, E-Flora, posts in detail about a specific plant, among many other interesting posts about events and general information.

This month's feature is  not about the hydrangea, which can be found at the Miller Library North Foundation Bed at the Center for Urban Horticulture.   
Here is the posting:
 

July 2017 Plant Profile: Hydrangea integrifolia
Hydrangea_integrifolia
 
(Photo by Riz Reyes)



Photo courtesy of Richie Steffen/Great Plant Picks
Photo courtesy of Richie Steffen/Great Plant Picks

This month, we revisit an old favorite, first featured in July 2014, and just starting to bloom out in the gardens. You can check it out at both the Center for Urban Horticulture and Washington Park Arboretum. Read more about its culture and care in our July Plant Profile.

An evergreen hydrangea? You betcha!
There are very few evergreen vines for gardeners in the Pacific Northwest, but this gorgeous gem from Asia is  becoming more readily available and it’s simply one of the coolest flowers you’ll ever get to witness opening.

From plump, peony-like buds, they begin to slowly crack open, a froth of fertile flowers begin to form and over the course of a few days, a flat umbel “lacecap” begins to form. People will begin to believe that it’s actually a hydrangea!


Hydrangea integrifolia is quite slow to establish (and re-establish, as we’ve learned after moving it to its new location at CUH three years ago) and may not even flower for the first few years of its life. Once it does, it puts on quite a show each summer. Dark green, glossy foliage remains year round. It’s a clinging plant that forms aerial roots on its stems. The aerial roots attach to a rough surface such as the bark of a tree or rough stucco wall; they don’t form tendrils or long whip-like shoots that wrap around supports so you have to carefully train them until they take hold. You could also let it sprawl on the ground as a ground-cover plant in a woodland garden.

They grow best in a protected spot in the garden such as a shady north-facing wall (such as our specimen here at the Center for Urban Horticulture), but they’re also quite at home tumbling over a stone wall in full sun with regular irrigation during the summer months.

Common Name:  Evergreen Climbing Hydrangea
Location: Center for Urban Horticulture – Miller Library North Foundation Bed; Washington Park Arborteum – Map grids 12-7E (near the Camelia collection) and 28-2E (growing up a Douglas fir near the Asiatic maple collection)
Origin: Taiwan/Philippines
Height and Spread: Can get 40′ tall and about 20′ wide
Bloom Time: Late June – July
Common Name: Evergreen Climbing Hydrangea
Location: Center for Urban Horticulture – Miller Library North Foundation Bed; Washington Park Arborteum – Map grids 12-7E (near the Camelia collection) and 28-2E (growing up a Douglas fir near the Asiatic maple collection)
Origin: Taiwan/Philippines
Height and Spread: Can get 40′ tall and about 20′ wide
Bloom Time: Late June – July

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